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Northeast Coastal Algonquin Tribes Paddle to Nisqually Northwest Tribal Canoe Journey’s

Marketing Assistant

#eastcoastalhealing

July 5, 2016:  

On July 24th, 2016 10-12 paddlers from the Coastal Algonquin indigenous communities will participate in the 2016 Paddle to Nisqually Tribal Canoe Journey, to help in coastal healing for awareness of environmental community need. 

Chenae Bullock asks permission to come ashore.

Chenae Bullock asks permission to come ashore.

Our coastal tribes utilize the waterways as ancient highways for thousands of years. As the original population of the American Northeastern region, we have faced European assimilation. Traditional culture is difficult to practice. Unity of the Indigenous groups and communities continues to strengthen through cultural customs being encouraged and expected. Much of the American History and “

Native American” history begins with our geographical Northeastern Coastal Algonquin history through the waterways. It is important to share the history to continue to educate.  Over 15 years indigenous communities continue to hold paddle ceremonies in honor of their ancestors. For example, the Wampanoag Paddle at Falmouth to Martha’s Vineyard, Passamaquoddy Paddle, Sly Fox Canoe Race, Nimpuck Sacred Paddle from Deer Island through the Boston Harbor, include historical paddles from Shinnecock territory of Long Island, New York.

The Pequot and Mohegan tribal groups from Southeastern, Connecticut, recently created the largest Mishoon made in over 400 years. Fourteen paddlers launched the Mishoon within the Mystic River holding fourteen tribal members of the Wampanoag, Shinnecock, Narragansett, Schaghticoke, and Pequot tribes. Unity amongst this year’s tribal groups includes greeting the Hokulea Voyage crew arrival to the northeastern Algonquin coastal territory. 

Paddle events are large and exhilarating experiences, assisting the resurgence of our responsibility as indigenous people to the water for all humanity. Global water crisis’s such as the NAVAJO WATER CRISIS and the FLINT WATER CRISIS are examples to pray for during paddle gatherings. 

This year’s Tribal Canoe Journey theme is “Don’t forget about the Water”. As coastal people, we were placed on the coast to protect and serve the water and the land. Many of our sister tribal communities NO LONGER HAVE WATER RIGHTS and are fighting for indigenous water rights. Water crisis happens in Indigenous communities far more than none native communities. 

Once landed in Seattle, WA on July 24, the paddlers will be transported to the first launch where they will paddle from and set camp. At each stop canoe families will follow common protocols, asking permission to come ashore, often in their native languages. Once ashore, they are invited to set camp. At night in the longhouses, there is gift giving, honoring, and the sharing of traditional prayer, drumming, songs, and dances. Meals, including evening dinner of traditional foods, are provided by host nations.

 

These rights have been taken away from them as early as 1636. 

This canoe journey allows the continuous survival of our threatened heritage as coastal people. We hope to travel and take part in the 2016 Paddle to Nisqually Tribal Canoe Journey’s to learn how regional coastal communities are working towards truth and reconciliation within their towns, cities, and states. We are seeking to create a stewardship to compare and learn how assimilation has impacted indigenous coastal communities. It is our goal as paddlers to foster the restoration of our traditional practice. 

We need your help! Please visit our go fund me page to donate and help us meet our goal!

Costs will cover:

•    Flights for 10-12 people round trip 

•    Fuel for transportation from airport to destinations

•    Camping gear for 10-12 people 

•    Food for nine days for 10-12 people 

•    Paddle supplies for 10-12 people

 

WE ALSO ENCOURAGE SPONSORS TO DONATE FLYER MILES FOR PADDLERS.

Our coastal tribes utilize the waterways as ancient highways for thousands of years.

Our coastal tribes utilize the waterways as ancient highways for thousands of years.

We kindly seek your support in hopes to provide water unity of the native communities. Youth and young adults are participating in bringing back the medicine for our communities. We request your assistance in helping us and our fundraiser to go viral not only for sponsorship but to create awareness around the world that the indigenous communities here on the Northeast coast not only are still here but continue to practice the custom of heritage.  

 

Please donate today!

If there are any questions feel free to reach out to Chenae Bullock at eastcoastalhealing@gmail.com 

 

 

 

Kuttabutash wutche kenauau annumau,

(thank you for you support)

Sagkompanau Mishoon Netooeusqua

(I lead canoe I am butterflywoman)